Knowledgebase

Number of results: 310

Through the wall sensors

Document type: 
Technology Trend card
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Fraunhofer for the SOURCE project
Abstract: 

1 page fact sheet on the technology trends of through-the wall sensing

Through the Wall Sensing (TWS) or Through the Wall Radar (TWR) describe technologies which enable the detection and localization of persons or objects through non transparent and non metallic matter (e.g. walls, debris). Active TWS systems use microwave or rather radar frequencies (2-30 Ghz), whereas passive systems are able to utilize radiation emitted by WLAN or broadcasting systems.

 

Biometric Recognition Technologies

Document type: 
Technology Trend card
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Fraunhofer for the SOURCE project
Abstract: 

1 page fact sheet on the technology trends of Biometric recognition technologies

"Biometric recognition includes a variety of technologies which are used for the automated identification and authentication of people. Unique identifiable attributes such as iris, retina or fingerprints, as well as hand, face, voice or gait patterns can be used to validate the identity of individuals"

 

National Security and Societal Implications of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems and Related Technologies

Document type: 
Interview/sound/video
Video: 
Publisher / Publication: 
The official broadcast channel of the IEEE Consumer Electronics Society. Video shot by the St. Petersburg State University of Film and Television
Abstract: 

 Lecture with Philip Hall on National Security and Societal Implications of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems and Related Technologies

(48 min)

Societal and Citizen Security Eelco Dykstra

Document type: 
Interview/sound/video
Video: 
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Standards Norway, the Norwegian Electrotechnical Committee and Standard Online, Oslo.
Abstract: 

Eelco Dykstra, from the Netherlands, interviewed on European standardards for societal and citizen security. Mr.

Dykstra is convenor of the working group on CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear).

 

The Privacy Surgeon

Document type: 
Blog/website
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
The PrivacySurgeon is owned and operated by Simon Davies
Abstract: 

A personal blog of Simon who is the Founder and for 22 years was Director-General of the influential watchdog group Privacy International which has been at the forefront of almost every major

sphere of privacy, from CCTV and identity systems to border surveillance and biometrics policy.. Over the years he has helped expose the secret machinations of governments, police authorities, corporations and spy agencies.

European Societal Security Research Group

Document type: 
Research project
Publisher / Publication: 
The European Societal Security Research Group benefits from a foundation grant provided by the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency. Sub-projects are occasionally funded from other government and academic sources.
Abstract: 

The European Societal Security Research Group brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars focused on the expanding security role of the European Union.

From military and civilian missions outside of Europe to counterterrorism, health security, food safety and critical infrastructure protection within Europe, EU members now cooperate across a host of new fields. Together, these efforts aim to improve the capacity of the EU as a whole to manage crises and protect individuals from harm. Described as "homeland security" in other national contexts, in Europe the expanding security role of the EU can be described in terms of "societal security".
Members of the group include scholars from Stockholm University, Leiden University, the Swedish National Defence College, and the Swedish Institute of International Affairs. Associate members are drawn from other universities and research institutes around the world.
Our core aim is to use empirically-driven analysis and theory innovation to generate new insights into how EU cooperation is contributing to the security and safety of individuals.

Broadening the Concept of Security: Identity and Societal Security

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Geopolitics Quarterly, ISSUE 20, VOL: 6, No.4 Winter 2010, PP 228-241
Abstract: 

This article concentrates on the evolution of the concept of security from its traditional ‘Realist’ base through to more ‘broadened’ approaches.

This study, therefore, moves beyond the conventional realist paradigm, and conversely looks at the concept of security using a ‘broadened’ perspective on security studies. In doing so, this paper asks: are the traditional concepts of security studies, particularly realism, in the post Cold War era still relevant? It is this question that forms the focus of this study. Most of the academic literature has far dealt with national security issues from an international and realist point of view. This has often neglected the internal dynamics of state’s security dilemma. This article studies the impact of societal security on state’s national security, this argument, however, has previously received little academic interest. This article thus contributes to a better understanding of the literature by clarifying conceptual approaches to societal security, and by applying these approaches in order to argue that the most pressing threat to state’s national security is within; and not from realist international pressures. The primary goal of this research is to contribute to academic debate regarding the concept of security by employing critical discourse analysis. Therefore, this study builds upon an array of secondary qualitative sources, both in order to construct the theoretical argument and to back this theory up with historical and social scientific data.

Hot Under the Collar: Lessons from the 2003 Heatwave in France and the Security Implications for Coping with Environmental Threats in the EU

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Journal of Contemporary European Research vol 5 (2), pp. 293-311
Abstract: 

In the sweltering temperatures of August 2003 there were over 15,000 fatalities in France, the majority among the elderly.

The heatwave (canicule) was the greatest natural catastrophe in Europe for 50 years. Political mismanagement contributed to the death toll and government initially to blame medical services. However, other politico-cultural, societal and psychological factors may have contributed to the failure to protect the most vulnerable citizens. This article identifies 20 obstacles (“pathogens”) to ensuring effective response in the face of environmental or weather-related threats, distinguishing between state-institutional and individual-community barriers, most of which have a cultural dimension. These factors require greater consideration by policy-makers to improve preparedness for environmental threats in the EU. The case raises questions about crisis management and how best to reduce risk for elderly populations, illustrating the limits of the state in offering social protection through institutionalised solidarity mechanisms, and recognises calls to strengthen community-capacity.

Global security in the 21st century: circulation, complexity and contingency

Document type: 
Report
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
ISP/NSC Briefing Paper 05/02, Chatham House
Abstract: 

Contemporary global security concerns can be distinguished from those of previous eras by developing three analytical terms: circulation, complexity and contingency.

Looking at security through these terms not only enables us to see how a cognitive shift is taking place in how global security is being thought about, but also raises a series of classic policy dilemmas that are becoming increasingly difficult for policy-makers to ignore.

Human Security and Liberal Peace

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Public Reason 1 (1): 91-104
Abstract: 

This paper addresses a recent wave of criticisms of liberal peacebuilding operations.

We decompose the critics’ argument into two steps, one which offers a diagnosis of what goes wrong when things go wrong in peacebuilding operations, and a second, which argues on the basis of the first step that there is some deep principled flaw in the very idea of liberal peacebuilding. We show that the criticism launched in the argument’s first step is valid and important, but that the second step by no means follows. Drawing a connection between liberal peacebuilding and humanitarian intervention, we argue that the problems that the critics point to are in fact best addressed within the framework of liberal internationalism itself. Further, we argue that the development of the notion of human security marks a dawning awareness within liberal internationalism of the kinds of problems that the critics point to, however difficult it may still be to embody these ideas in practice.

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