Knowledgebase

Number of results: 159

Nordic Centre of Excellence for Security Technologies and Societal Values (NordSTEVA)

Document type: 
Blog/website
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
NordForsk
Abstract: 

Nordic Centre of Excellence for Security Technologies and Societal Values (NordSTEVA) is a virtual centre of excellence whose aim is to advance research, education and training, industrial strategy

and public policy in support of a wider and deeper understanding of the security technology/values interface. The centre will draw together and integrate diverse ideas, capabilities and experiences in order to generate new knowledge, new approaches, and new solutions in support of the enhancement of Nordic societal security.

SOURCE Legal Card –Commission proposal for a European Border and Coast Guard (EBCG)

Document type: 
Legal Trend card
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
CEPS

SOURCE Legal & Policy Card –European Maritime Border Surveillance

Document type: 
Legal Trend card
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
CEPS

SOURCE Legal Card –European Agenda on Migration (EMA)

Document type: 
Legal Trend card
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
CEPS

SOURCE Legal Card – Communication from Commission on The European Agenda on Security (EAS)

Document type: 
Legal Trend card
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
CEPS

The Role of Values in Threat Analysis, SOURCE Deliverable D6.1

Document type: 
Report
Publisher / Publication: 
SOURCE Deliverable
Abstract: 

This report aims to clarify the role of values in the conceptualisation of security in threat analyses in the different sectors of the overall security landscape in Europe.

This is done on the basis of analyses of official documents, policy pronouncements, literature reviews and interviews. It is argued that the connection between values and threats often remains unclear in security strategies and risk assessments referring to values like human rights, democracy and the rule of law for their justification. In want of common operationalisations of these values, it results in a great variety of risk assessments where the value impact of risks is evaluated differently.  As a basis for security policy, there is therefore a need for making the normative judgments involved in the analyses more explicit. The authors of this report highlight three basic dimensions of such value judgments, related to questions of universalism vs. relativism and individualism vs. collectivism. These are exemplified by cases of refugee management and everyday security. Against this background, the landscape of European threat analysis is then reviewed, including a new type of national risk assessments prescribed by EU regulations on disaster risk management.  

Foreign National Prisoners in the UK: Explanations and Implications

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice
Abstract: 

This article examines the rapid expansion of the foreign national prison population in the UK against a backdrop of public and political anxiety about immigration and crime.

It explores official data considering some of the possible explanations for the growth in the number of foreign national prisoners and the implications this has for penal management. Whilst increases in both the number of foreign nationals entering the UK and the number of foreign nationals in UK prisons has strengthened the association between immigration and crime in the public imagination, there is little empirical evidence to suggest that foreign nationals are more dangerous than British nationals. Instead, the growth of the foreign national prison population appears to stem from a number of sources that may operate alone or in tandem.

Are Children of Immigrants Born in Sweden More Law-Abiding Than Immigrants? A Reconsideration

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Race and Justice July 1, 2015 5: 278-300
Abstract: 

Previous Swedish studies have found that second-generation immigrants participate in offending less than first-generation immigrants, which is a striking finding from an international perspective.

The aim of this study is to critically investigate the idea that second-generation immigrants have lower rates of registered offending than first-generation immigrants. The population of the present study consists of all 4.4 million persons who were registered as living in Sweden at the end of 1996. These people were followed for 5 years. During this time, 280,000 persons were registered for 1.5 million offenses. As far as the participation in overall offending is concerned the previous results were reproduced. However, when focusing on the offending rates in different offense types, the first-generation immigrants have the highest risks of being registered for violent crimes and second-generation immigrants with no Swedish-born parents have the highest risks for property crimes. The pattern found is further discussed in relation to the risk of second-generation immigrants with no Swedish-born parent to develop a criminal career and thereby frames the problem of criminality in culture differences, immigration policy, and so on.

The fiscal effects of immigration to the UK

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
The Economic Journal, Doi: 10.1111/ecoj.12181
Abstract: 

We investigate the fiscal impact of immigration on the UK economy, with a focus on the period since

1995. Our findings indicate that, when considering the resident immigrant population in each year
from 1995 to 2011, immigrants from the European Economic Area (EEA) have made a positive fiscal
contribution, even during periods when the UK was running budget deficits, while Non-EEA
immigrants, not dissimilar to natives, have made a negative contribution. For immigrants that arrived
since 2000, contributions have been positive throughout, and particularly so for immigrants from
EEA countries. Notable is the strong positive contribution made by immigrants from countries that
joined the EU in 2004.

Mass Surveillance - Part 1 Risks, Opportunities and Mitigation Strategies

Document type: 
Report
Publisher / Publication: 
EPRS European Parliamentary Research Service - Scientific Foresight (STOA) Unit PE 527.409
Abstract: 

This document identifies the risks of data breaches for users of publicly available Internet services such as email, social networks and cloud computing, and the possible impacts for them and the E

uropean Information Society. It presents the latest technology advances allowing the analysis of user data and their meta-data on a mass scale for surveillance reasons. It identifies technological and organisational measures and the key stakeholders for reducing the risks identified. Finally the study proposes possible policy options, in support of the risk reduction measures identified by the study.
This study covers the analysis of the existing generation of network services and applications at the time of the study (2014) and the short to mid-term technical measures and policy options suitable for counteracting mass surveillance practices and guaranteeing privacy and security of electronic communication channels.
Future long-term technological and policy options addressing privacy and security in information and communication technologies are outlined in part two of this study, published by STOA.

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