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Number of results: 245

Assessing Community Resilience: An application of the expanded CART survey instrument with affiliated volunteer responders

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Publisher / Publication: 
American Behavioral Scientist, 59 (2): 181-199
Abstract: 

This article describes an application of the Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit Assessment Survey using a sample of affiliated volunteer responders.

The Communities Advancing Resilience Toolkit Assessment Survey is a theory-based, evidence-informed instrument. Early applications of the survey identified four domains: Connection and Caring, Resources, Transformative Potential, and Disaster Management. The version of the instrument used in the current application added items related to Information and Communication, thus creating a fifth domain. The application confirmed the five-factor model and the instrument demonstrated good reliability. Affiliated volunteer responders served as key informants regarding community resilience because of their involvement in local disaster readiness and response. Home ownership and active membership in an affiliated volunteer responder group were associated with the total community resilience score and with multiple domain scores, suggesting the importance of community member investment and engagement for a community’s resilience. Although the study sample involved affiliated volunteer responders, it is likely that engagement in other community organizations and activities may yield similar benefits for resilience.

Revised Prevent Duty Guidance: for England and Wales

Document type: 
Policy document
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
UK Government
Abstract: 

This guidance identifies best practice for each of the main sectors and describes ways in which they can comply with the duty.

It includes sources of further advice and provides information on how compliance with the duty will be monitored. 

The Prevent Duty - Departmental advice for schools and childcare providers

Document type: 
Policy document
Publisher / Publication: 
UK Government - Department for Education
Abstract: 

From 1 July 2015 all schools, registered early years childcare providers and registered later years childcare providers are subject to a duty under section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and

Security Act 2015, in the exercise of their functions, to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. This duty is known as the Prevent duty. It applies to a wide range of public-facing bodies. This advice complements the statutory guidance and refers to other relevant guidance and advice. It is intended to help schools and childcare providers think about what they can do to protect children from the risk of radicalisation and suggests how they can access support to do this. It reflects actions that many schools and childcare providers will already be taking to protect children from this risk. 

On Suicide Bombing

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Columbia University Press
Abstract: 

Drawing on his extensive scholarship in the study of secular and religious traditions as well as his understanding of social, political, and anthropological theory and research, Asad questions West

ern assumptions regarding death and killing. He scrutinizes the idea of a "clash of civilizations," the claim that "Islamic jihadism" is the essence of modern terror, and the arguments put forward by liberals to justify war in our time. He critically engages with a range of explanations of suicide terrorism, exploring many writers' preoccupation with the motives of perpetrators. In conclusion, Asad examines our emotional response to suicide (including suicide terrorism) and the horror it invokes.

Frames of War - When Is Life Grievable?

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Verso Books, New York
Abstract: 

In Frames of War, Judith Butler explores the media's portrayal of state violence, a process integral to the way in which the West wages modern war.

This portrayal has saturated our understanding of human life, and has led to the exploitation and abandonment of whole peoples, who are cast as existential threats rather than as living populations in need of protection. These people are framed as already lost, to imprisonment, unemployment and starvation, and can easily be dismissed. In the twisted logic that rationalizes their deaths, the loss of such populations is deemed necessary to protect the lives of 'the living.' This disparity, Butler argues, has profound implications for why and when we feel horror, outrage, guilt, loss and righteous indifference, both in the context of war and, increasingly, everyday life.

Populist Radical Right Parties in the Nordic Region: A New and Distinct Party Family?

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Publisher / Publication: 
Scandinavian Political Studies, 37 (3): 215-238
Abstract: 

The Nordic countries are no longer characterized by a stable five-party system.

Not only have small Christian parties and Green parties emerged in most countries, so-called ‘populist radical right parties’ have also been increasingly successful in recent decades. This article examines to what extent the populist radical right parties in the Nordic countries represent a new party family. Based on various and original data, including archive material, interviews with key representatives, party manifestos and expert surveys, the processes of deciding party names, the development of transnational linkages and ideological transformation are analyzed. The article demonstrates that even though the Danish People's Party, the True Finns and the Sweden Democrats have different historical legacies, they have converged ideologically (i.e., socioeconomically centrist and socioculturally authoritarian), adopted similar names and are on the verge of becoming a more formalized transnational actor. The Progress Party in Norway is better seen as a hybrid between a populist radical right party and a more traditional conservative party. The findings challenge several classifications in the extensive literature on populist radical right parties. Most importantly, the True Finns should be included as a populist radical right party, whereas the Norwegian party should be treated more carefully. Furthermore, Nordic populist radical right parties are no longer – if they have ever been – so-called ‘neoliberal populists’. Finally, the findings suggest a re-freezing of the Nordic party systems in which a phase of divergence has been replaced by a phase of convergence.

The Ideology of the Extreme Right

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Manchester University Press
Abstract: 

Though the extreme right was not particularly successful in the 1999 European elections, it continues to be a major factor in the politics of Western Europe.

This book provides a comprehensive and detailed analysis of the extreme right in the Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany. On the basis of original research--using party literature--the author concludes that though individual parties might stress different issues, the extreme right party family does share a core ideology of nationalism, xenophobia, welfare chauvinism, and law and order.

Radicalism and Political Reform in the Islamic and Western Worlds

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Cambridge University Press
Abstract: 

Over the last decade, political Islam has been denounced in the Western media and in the surrounding literature as a terrorist or fascist movement that is entirely at odds with Western democratic i

deology. Kai Hafez's book overturns these arguments, contending that, despite its excesses, as a radical form of political opposition the movement plays a central role in the processes of democratization and modernization, and that these processes have direct parallels in the history and politics of the West. By analyzing the evolution of Christian democratization through the upheavals of the Reformation, colonisation, fascism, and totalitarianism, the book shows how radicalism and violence were constant accompaniments to political change, and that these components - despite assertions to the contrary - are still part of Western political culture to this day.

Islam and Political Violence

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Religions, 6 (3): 1067-1081
Abstract: 

The global threat of Al Qaeda post 9/11 and ISIL, increased Sunni-Shia conflicts, and violence in the Middle East and Pakistan dominate headlines and challenge governments in the region and globall

y. Both Muslim extremists and some Western experts and observers speak of a clash of civilizations or a culture war in Muslim-West relations. Both the discourse and violence yet again raise questions about the relationship of Islam to violence and terrorism: is Islam a particularly violent religion? Critics cite Quranic passages, doctrines like jihad and events in Muslim history as strong indicators and proof that Islam is the primary driver of Muslim extremism and terrorism. What do the Quran and Islamic law have to say about violence, jihad and warfare? What are the primary drivers of terrorism in the name of Islam today? This article will address these questions in the context of development of global jihadist movements, in particular Al Qaeda and ISIL, their roots, causes, ideology and agenda.

The parallel decline of multiculturalism and the welfare state in the Netherlands

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Chapter 6 in: Multiculturalism and the Welfare State: Recognition and Redistribution in Contemporary Democracies, Keith Banting and Will Kymlicka (eds.), Oxford University Press (Scholarship Online)
Abstract: 

This chapter examines whether there is a causal relationship between the recent changes in Dutch multiculturalist policies and the decline of the Dutch welfare state.

During the post-war years, the Dutch built one of the most generous welfare states in Europe and adopted a strongly multiculturalist Minorities Policy, which reflected an extension of their approach to historic diversities, known as pillarization. During the 1990s, however, the Netherlands reduced the scope of its welfare state and shifted away from multiculturalism. It is argued here that the corrosive effects of MCPs did not contribute to the decline of the Dutch welfare state. On one side, restructuring the welfare state reflected economic and ideological trends common to Western democracies, and there is little evidence that issues of immigration or multiculturalism played a role in the political shift. On the other side, the shift away from the traditional approach to multiculturalism was driven by concern that the approach was contributing to the exclusion of minorities from the economic and social mainstream of Dutch society, and not by concerns about the impact of multiculturalism on the welfare state.

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