Knowledgebase

Number of results: 159

The EU Justice Agenda for 2020 - Strengthening Trust, Mobility and Growth within the Union - COM(2014) 144

Document type: 
Policy document
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS
Abstract: 

The European Commission outlines its vision for the future EU justice policy which aims at making further progress towards a fully functioning common European area of justice based on tru

st, mobility and growth by 2020.

An open and secure Europe: making it happen - COM(2014) 154

Document type: 
Policy document
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS
Abstract: 

In this communication, the European Commission is presenting its vision on the future agenda for Home Affairs: there is a need to fully implement the agreed legislation and existing instruments and

to ensure that the EU is able to respond to opportunities and challenges ahead.

The US surveillance programmes and their impact on EU citizens' fundamental rights

Document type: 
Report
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
European Parliament / LIBE
Abstract: 

In light of the recent PRISM-related revelations, this briefing note analyzes the impact of US surveillance programmes on European citizens’ rights.

The note explores the scope of surveillance that can be carried out under the US FISA Amendments Act 2008, and related practices of the US authorities which have very strong implications for EU data sovereignty and the protection of European citizens’ rights. 

My blindness – and the curious tension with privacy

Document type: 
Blog/website
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
The Privacy Surgeon - Where Obfuscation meets the Scalpel
Abstract: 

Blog Entry by Simon Davies, discussing the intrusion into the private life of disabled persons

Low-tech Security: Files, Notes and Memos as Technologies of Anticipation

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Dialogue, 45 (5): 476-493
Abstract: 

When it comes to anticipating terrorism, do recent technological advancements fundamentally change the modus operandi of intelligence services?

Recent scholarship has focused on the new modes of reasoning brought about by ‘hi-tech’ forms analysis such as data mining, graph visualization and the algorithmic treatment of big data. While this article recognizes the increasing influence of these techniques, it argues they should not overshadow much more low-tech modalities through which a large part of counterterrorism work takes place. Low-tech counter-terrorism, based on qualitative methods and conjectural reasoning, still matters. Drawing on the case of French domestic intelligence services and based on qualitative interviews, observations and declassified documents, this article shows that the practices of security professionals, rooted in traditional institutional habituses developed over time, are largely in continuity with previous ‘low-tech’ forms of police work. In a context in which the uses of digital security technologies have generated discussions about politics and ethics, this article suggests that traditional techniques of intelligence gathering and processing therefore still merit a great amount of attention.

Developing an EU Internal Security Strategy, fighting terrorism and organised crime

Document type: 
Report
Publisher / Publication: 
European Parliament / LIBE Committee
Abstract: 

The present study examines the steps taken since the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty in the field of internal security and assesses commitments made in the areas of fundamental rights and civ

il liberties. The study examines the development of the EU Internal Security Strategy, with special attention paid to fighting terrorism and organised crime. It also investigates the activities of the main EU agencies involved in internal security policies. The study finally sketches out the key challenges lying ahead for EU internal security policies, with particular consideration paid to the role that the European Parliament will be called upon to play. 

Security - Analysing transnational professionals of (in)security in Europe

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Chapter in: Rebecca Adler-Niessen (ed.), Bourdieu in International Relations - Rethinking Key Concepts in IR, Routledge, pp. 114-130
Abstract: 

This chapter tries to sum up why the problematisation suggested by Pierre Bourdieu in terms of practice instead of norms and values or interest and rational choice, of relational approach instead o

f essentialism or interactionism, permits rethinking security differently. It is crucial to understand agents' practices concerning (in)security as forms of strategies of distinction instead of rational calculus, of field and habitus instead of structure and agency, of trajectories and change instead of stability and (dis)order, of field of power, field of national state and field of professionals of politics, law, security instead of a vision in terms of state-society and interstate actors. 

Review of Security Measures in the 7th Research Framework Programme FP7 2007-2013

Document type: 
Report
Publisher / Publication: 
European Parliament / LIBE Committee
Abstract: 

Upon request by the LIBE Committee, this study analyses how the public-private dialogue has been framed and shaped and examines the priorities set up in calls and projects that have received fundin

g from the European Commission under the security theme of the 7th Research Framework Programme (FP7 2007­ 2013). In particular, this study addresses two main questions: to what extent is security research placed at the service of citizens? To what extent does it contribute to the development of a single area of fundamental rights and freedoms? The study finds that security research has only partly addressed the concerns of EU citizens and that security research has been mainly put at the service of industry rather than society. 

The promise of security: resilience, surprise and epistemic politics

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses, 2 (2): 73-87
Abstract: 

Over the past decade, resilience has become a quasi-universal answer to problems of security and governance, from climate change to children's education, from indigenous history to disaster respons

e, and from development to terrorism. This article places the proliferation of resilience in relation to the earlier proliferation of security discourse and practice. Why resilience today? It answers this question by unpacking the epistemic regimes that underpin the move to resilience. Rather than tracing the differences between protection, prevention, pre-emption and resilience, the article argues that the political transformation that resilience entails becomes explicit in relation to the promise of security. Although the language of ‘promise’ and ‘promising’ has been widely used in relation to security, its political implications have remained unexplored. Underpinned by an epistemology of surprising events, resilience discourses reconfigure the promise of security. Through an empirical engagement with the turn to resilience in DFID's humanitarian policy in the UK and a theoretical reconsideration of Hannah Arendt's conceptualisation of the promise, I offer a critical vantage point on the transformation that resilience portends for our contemporary condition.

The Time/Space of Preparedness: Anticipating the “Next Terrorist Attack”

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Space & Culture, 15 (2): 98-109
Abstract: 

The “next terrorist attack” has become one of the main fixtures of the collective imagination of catastrophic futures.

Reflecting on a series of exercises and scenarios deployed to prepare for terrorist attacks, this article interrogates the co-constitution of temporality and spatiality in such practices. The main argument is that practices of preparedness enact a withdrawal of time, where the temporal uncertainty of the future event is displaced on the management of space. The separation of space and time implies that actions are not focused on understanding the conditions of possibility of the disruptive event but shift attention to the management of spaces and attention to behaviour that is considered out of place.

Pages

Go to top