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Number of results: 245

The European Council’s Guidelines for the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice 2020: Subverting the ‘Lisbonisation’ of Justice and Home Affairs?

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
CEPS - Centre for European Policy Studies
Abstract: 

In its Conclusions of 26-27 June 2014, the European Council has adopted the new “Strategic Guidelines for Legislative and Operational Planning for the coming years within the EU’s Area of Freedom,

Security and Justice (AFSJ)”. These Guidelines reveal a pre-Lisbon Treaty mindset among the EU member states and the Justice and Home Affairs Council. This essay argues that the Guidelines are mainly driven by the interests and agendas of national Ministries of Interior and Justice and are only “strategic” to the extent that they aim at first, re-injecting ‘intergovernmentalism’ or bringing back the old EU Third Pillar ways of working to the new EU institutional setting of the AFSJ and second, at sidelining the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights and rule of law in the AFSJ. The paper argues that the European Council Guidelines seek to prevent the advances in Justice and Home Affairs cooperation as envisaged in the Treaty of Lisbon, particularly its emphasis on supranational democratic, legal and judicial accountability. As a consequence of this move to ‘de-Lisbonise’ JHA cooperation, fundamental rights and rule of law-related initiatives will be neglected and the interest of the individual will be displaced from the centre of gravity in the coming AFSJ 2020 policy agenda. 

The European Council’s Guidelines for the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice 2020: Subverting the ‘Lisbonisation’ of Justice and Home Affairs?

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
CEPS - Centre for European Policy Studies
Abstract: 

In its Conclusions of 26-27 June 2014, the European Council has adopted the new “Strategic Guidelines for Legislative and Operational Planning for the coming years within the EU’s Area of Freedom,

Security and Justice (AFSJ)”. These Guidelines reveal a pre-Lisbon Treaty mindset among the EU member states and the Justice and Home Affairs Council. This essay argues that the Guidelines are mainly driven by the interests and agendas of national Ministries of Interior and Justice and are only “strategic” to the extent that they aim at first, re-injecting ‘intergovernmentalism’ or bringing back the old EU Third Pillar ways of working to the new EU institutional setting of the AFSJ and second, at sidelining the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights and rule of law in the AFSJ. The paper argues that the European Council Guidelines seek to prevent the advances in Justice and Home Affairs cooperation as envisaged in the Treaty of Lisbon, particularly its emphasis on supranational democratic, legal and judicial accountability. As a consequence of this move to ‘de-Lisbonise’ JHA cooperation, fundamental rights and rule of law-related initiatives will be neglected and the interest of the individual will be displaced from the centre of gravity in the coming AFSJ 2020 policy agenda. 

Europe's 21st Century Challenge: Delivering Liberty

Document type: 
Book
Publisher / Publication: 
Routledge
Abstract: 

This volume presents the final results of the CHALLENGE research project (The Changing Landscape of European Liberty and Security) - a five-year project funded by the Sixth Framework Programme of D

G Research of the European Commission. The book critically appraises the liberties of citizens and others within the EU, and the different ways in which they are affected by the proliferation of discourses, practices and norms of insecurity enacted in the name of collective and individual safety. It analyses from an interdisciplinary perspective the impacts of new techniques of surveillance and control on the liberty and security of the citizen. The book studies illiberal practices of liberal regimes in the field of security, and the relationship between the internal and external effects of these practices in an increasingly interconnected world, as well as the effects in relation to the place of the EU in world politics.

Foreign fighters and returnees from a counter-terrorism perspective, in particular with regard to Syria: state of play and proposals for future work

Document type: 
Policy document
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Note to the Council of the European Union - Justice and Home Affairs
Abstract: 

Foreign fighters remain a major threat to the European Union and its Member States, as well as to the MENA region: Syria continues to attract growing numbers of foreign fighters, including from Eur

ope. The phenomenon is likely to persist in the coming years. An effective response must be comprehensive and requires a long-term commitment.

In December 2013, the Council identified four priority areas where EU action in support of Member States' efforts would be particularly useful: prevention, information exchange, criminal justice response and cooperation with third countries1. Progress was made in all four areas, but the response is not yet where it needs to be given the scale of the threat.

The present paper by the CTC, in close consultation with the services of the Commission and the EEAS, provides an update on progress and a number of suggestions for possible new actions in the four priority areas. 

European Union Maritime Security Strategy

Document type: 
Policy document
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
The Council of the European Union - Note to Delegations
Abstract: 

European Union Maritime Security Strategy as adopted by the Council (General Affairs) on 24 June 2014. 

The final implementation report of the EU Internal Security Strategy 2010-2014 -COM(2014) 365

Document type: 
Policy document
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL
Abstract: 

The European Commission assesses the progress made under each key area of the EU Internal Security Strategy (ISS) since 2010 and identifies possible ways to step up the EU's response to common thre

ats such as organised crime,  trafficking in human beings, terrorism, cybercrime, corruption, etc. While the objectives of the Strategy remain valid, concrete measures and actions must be reviewed ahead of the adoption, in 2015, of a renewed Internal Security Strategy.

The EU Justice Agenda for 2020 - Strengthening Trust, Mobility and Growth within the Union - COM(2014) 144

Document type: 
Policy document
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS
Abstract: 

The European Commission outlines its vision for the future EU justice policy which aims at making further progress towards a fully functioning common European area of justice based on tru

st, mobility and growth by 2020.

An open and secure Europe: making it happen - COM(2014) 154

Document type: 
Policy document
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS
Abstract: 

In this communication, the European Commission is presenting its vision on the future agenda for Home Affairs: there is a need to fully implement the agreed legislation and existing instruments and

to ensure that the EU is able to respond to opportunities and challenges ahead.

The US surveillance programmes and their impact on EU citizens' fundamental rights

Document type: 
Report
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
European Parliament / LIBE
Abstract: 

In light of the recent PRISM-related revelations, this briefing note analyzes the impact of US surveillance programmes on European citizens’ rights.

The note explores the scope of surveillance that can be carried out under the US FISA Amendments Act 2008, and related practices of the US authorities which have very strong implications for EU data sovereignty and the protection of European citizens’ rights. 

My blindness – and the curious tension with privacy

Document type: 
Blog/website
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
The Privacy Surgeon - Where Obfuscation meets the Scalpel
Abstract: 

Blog Entry by Simon Davies, discussing the intrusion into the private life of disabled persons

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