Knowledgebase

Number of results: 29

All 25 technology trend cards

Document type: 
SOURCE publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Fraunhofer for the SOURCE project
Abstract: 

An overview of twenty five technoclogies and their trends as relevant to societal security

5G - Next Generation Mobile Network, Agent-based Modelling, Augmented Reality Systems, Automated human behavior analysis, Biometric Recognition Technologies, Bioremediation, Blockchain, CRISPR/Cas, Earthquake Prediction, Emergency Management Information Systems, European Maritime Surveillance Systems, Homomorphic Encryption, Indoor Navigation, Internet of Things Security, Machine Learning for Security Applications, Nano Air Vehicles, Non-lethal electromagnetic weapons for crowd control, Post-Quantum Cryptography, Predictive Policing, Quantum Cryptography, Serious Games, Smart Grid, Swarm Robotics, Through-the-Wall Sensing, Whole Body Scanner, 

 

E-Handbook on Societal Security Crises and Emergency Response in Europe

Document type: 
SOURCE publication
Publisher / Publication: 
Insitute for European Studies, Vrije Universiteit Brussel for the SOURCE project
Abstract: 

The e-handbook is an innovative educational tool for first responders managing crises in the area of societal security.

It features six multi-media case-studies coming from different parts of Europe, namely: Austria, Sweden, Belgium, and Spain. The case-studies explore and re-construct strategies and actions of first response professionals involved in management of socio-political emergencies and natural disasters. In addition to texts, the interactive content includes educational assignments and video interviews, in which professionals, who took on key roles in the crisis management and emergency response, share their experiences.

How to address security threats - Ida Haisman The Hague Security Delta

Document type: 
Interview/sound/video
Video: 
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Video interview made for SOURCE
Abstract: 

Ida Haisma is the director of The Hague Security Delta (HSD), the largest security cluster in Europe, where businesses, governments and knowledge institutions work together on innovation and knowle

dge in the field of safety and security. This video interview is a part of a series of interviews with experts in the field of security for SOURCE Virtual centre of excellence for research support and coordination on societal security http://www.societalsecurity.net/ Made by Ólöf Söebech and Louise Baduel

Smartening border security in the European Union: An associational inquiry

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Dialogue, 47 (4): 292–309
Abstract: 

This contribution asks how the reliance on mass dataveillance of travellers is sustained as a central policy option in the governance of EU border security.

It examines this question by analysing a recent initiative of the European Commission proposing the establishment of EU ‘smart borders’. The analysis draws from a set of thinking tools developed by the sociology of association in the field of science and technology studies. The contribution argues that in order to grasp policy outcomes such as smart borders, security studies would benefit from adopting a compositional outlook on agency, where action is seen as the effect of associated entities. Looking at the smartening of EU borders, the article finds that this process is held together by multiple translations and enrolments through which the technical side of dataveillance – platforms, automated gates, matching systems, and so forth – has become associated with the processes of policymaking on border security and sustains the furtherance of mass dataveillance.

EU and NATO cybersecurity strategies and national cyber security strategies: a comparative analysis

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Journal, 30 (4): 1151–1168
Abstract: 

Given the global nature of cyber threats, assurance of a cyber security policy is very important not only at organization level but also at national level.

Currently, cyber security as such is not independently regulated internationally; therefore the role of the EU and NATO in ensuring cyber security has become particularly significant. This article presents a study which compares the cyber security policies of the EU and NATO organizations. An analysis of how national cyber security strategies correspond with the cyber security policies and the strategic directions of these organizations has been carried out. We have also carried out a comparative study of the provision of national cyber security strategies of the EU and NATO. The study reveals that regardless of similar goals, namely assurance of cyber resilience, the selected harmonization and coordination approaches, as well as norms of national cybersecurity strategies, differ.

Big hover or big brother? Public attitudes about drone usage in domestic policing activities

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Journal, 30 (4): 1027–1044
Abstract: 

Unmanned aerial systems (that is, UAS or drones) have been increasingly proposed and used by federal and state law enforcement agencies as an evolving technology for general surveillance, crime det

ection and criminal investigations. However, the use of UAS technology, in general, and within the particular context of domestic policing activities raises serious concerns about personal privacy and the greater intrusion of new forms of ‘big brother’ surveillance in people’s daily lives. On the basis of a national survey, the current study provides empirical evidence on public attitudes about UAS usage in various policing activities. Socio-demographic differences in the public support for drone usage in this context are also examined. Our general findings of context-specific variability in public support for UAS usage in policing operations are discussed in terms of their implications for developing public policy.

Cross-border crime patterns unveiled by exchange of DNA profiles in the European Union

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Journal, 29 (4): 640-660
Abstract: 

The aim of this study was to make a head start with unveiling transnational spatial patterns in offending.

To that end, data are used from DNA profile exchange between The Netherlands and 18 other EU member states that have implemented EU legislation on forensic cooperation. Information was collected on all DNA stains entered into the database, including the region in The Netherlands where the stain was secured, the type of crime and how many matching DNA profiles had been identified in each of the other 18 countries. The results suggest that currently the profiles of offenders who are active in other Prüm countries make up for about 4 per cent of all DNA stain profiles in the Dutch DNA database. The highest share of cross-border matches is found in the southeastern part of The Netherlands, where The Netherlands borders one of the most densely populated regions of Germany.

Policing Uncertainty: Intelligence, Security and Risk

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Intelligence and National Security, 27 (2): 187-205
Abstract: 

Today, the idea of risk is ubiquitous, a presence in debates across a range of fields, from investment banking to politics, from anthropology and sociology to health, environmental and cultural stu

dies. While this ubiquity attests to the importance of the concept it is at the same time a potential weakness in that it injects the term into a wide range of debates in each of which its meaning can be subject to different emphases and meanings. The notion of risk is of obvious importance to security intelligence, but here too its ubiquity has had an impact on specificity of meaning. While the term is widely used in both the profession and study of intelligence, its usage can carry different meanings and it can be used interchangeably with linked terms. Given the importance of the idea of risk to intelligence, clarity of meaning is essential. This article sets out to consider the meaning of, and relationship between, uncertainty and risk in a security intelligence context, propose a framework on which a common understanding can be built, and illustrate how this can help in thinking about the nature and role of security intelligence.

Theorizing Surveillance: The Panopticon and Beyond

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Routledge
Abstract: 

This book is about explaining surveillance processes and practices in contemporary society.

Surveillance studies is a relatively new multi-disciplinary enterprise that aims to understand who watches who, how the watched participate in and sometimes question their surveillance, why surveillance occurs, and with what effects. This book brings together some of the world's leading surveillance scholars to discuss the "why" question. The field has been dominated, since the groundbreaking work of Michel Foucault, by the idea of the panopticon and this book explores why this metaphor has been central to discussions of surveillance, what is fruitful in the panoptic approach, and what other possible approaches can throw better light on the phenomena in question.Since the advent of networked computer databases, and especially since 9/11, questions of surveillance have come increasingly to the forefront of democratic, political and policy debates in the global north (and to an extent in the global south). Civil liberties, democratic participation and privacy are some of the issues that are raised by these developments. But little progress can be made in responding to these issues without an adequate understanding of how, how well and whether or not surveillance works. This book explores the theoretical questions in a way that is grounded in and attuned to empirical realities.

Resilience, Deterrence and Defence: Building strong cybersecurity for the EU - JOIN (2017) 450

Document type: 
Policy document
Publisher / Publication: 
European Commission / European External Action Service
Abstract: 

The European Commission and the High Representative propose a wide range of concrete measures to further strengthen the EU’s cybersecurity structures and capabilities with more cooperation between

the Member States and the different EU structures concerned. These measures are intended to ensure that the EU is better prepared to face the ever-increasing cybersecurity challenges. The approach set out in this Joint Communication aims at building greater resilience and strategic autonomy, boosting capabilities interms of technology and skills, as well as helping to build a strong single market. Additionally, it aims at a better deterence against cyber-attacks, by stepping up work to detect, trace and hold to account those responsible. 

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