Knowledgebase

Number of results: 5

Feminist Security Studies - A Narrative Approach

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Routledge
Abstract: 

The volume explicitly works toward an opening up of security studies that would allow for feminist (and other) narratives to be recognized and taken seriously as security narratives.

To make this possible, it presents a feminist reading of security studies that aims to invigorate the debate and radicalize critical security studies. Since feminism is a political project, and security studies are, at their base, about particular visions of the political and their attendant institutions, this is of necessity a political intervention. The book works through and beyond security studies to explore possible spaces where an opening of security, necessary to make way for feminist insights, can take place. While it develops and illustrates a feminist narrative approach to security, it is also intended as an intervention that challenges the politics of security and the meanings for security legitimized in existing practices.

Identity and Desecuritisation: the pitfalls of conflating ontological and physical security

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Journal of International Relations & Development, 18 (1): 52-74
Abstract: 

How can the Self move from a securitised to a non-securitised relation with the Other while its very identity depends on its relation to the Other?

Within the existing critical approaches to security, this question, which encapsulates the complex interrelationship between identity and desecuritisation, has not been explored in a systematic manner. This article builds on the emerging literature on ontological security to develop a two-layered framework of security as both ontological and physical, wherein the relationship between identity and desecuritisation can be better analysed. I argue that the conflation of ontological and physical security within the existing critical approaches to security has generated an insufficient appreciation of how identity expands the possibilities for desecuritisation while imposing new limits. In particular, the framework offered in this article highlights the possibilities for achieving ontological security in the absence of securitisation and limits to desecuritisation that stem from ontological insecurity.

Ethnic Violence and the Societal Security Dilemma

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Routledge
Abstract: 

Ethnic Violence and the Societal Security Dilemma explores how the phenomenon of ethnic violence can be understood as a form of security dilemma by shifting the focus of the concept away from its t

raditional concern with state sovereignty to that of identity instead.

The book is divided into theoretical and empirical chapters, beginning with the categorisation by the author of the security dilemma concept into ‘tight’, ‘regular’ and ‘loose’ formations, and its combination with the Copenhagen School’s notion of societal security. This reconceptualisation of the traditional security dilemma then provides a framework capable of explaining conflictual dynamics between ethnic groups and how some cases can be resolved without recourse to outright war. 

The Role of Values in Threat Analysis, SOURCE Deliverable D6.1

Document type: 
Report
Publisher / Publication: 
SOURCE Deliverable
Abstract: 

This report aims to clarify the role of values in the conceptualisation of security in threat analyses in the different sectors of the overall security landscape in Europe.

This is done on the basis of analyses of official documents, policy pronouncements, literature reviews and interviews. It is argued that the connection between values and threats often remains unclear in security strategies and risk assessments referring to values like human rights, democracy and the rule of law for their justification. In want of common operationalisations of these values, it results in a great variety of risk assessments where the value impact of risks is evaluated differently.  As a basis for security policy, there is therefore a need for making the normative judgments involved in the analyses more explicit. The authors of this report highlight three basic dimensions of such value judgments, related to questions of universalism vs. relativism and individualism vs. collectivism. These are exemplified by cases of refugee management and everyday security. Against this background, the landscape of European threat analysis is then reviewed, including a new type of national risk assessments prescribed by EU regulations on disaster risk management.  

Automated human behavior analysis

Document type: 
Technology Trend card
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Fraunhofer for the SOURCE project
Abstract: 

1 page fact sheet on the technology trends of Automated human behavior analysis

The term automated human behavior analysis (AHBA) stands  for  the  identification and assessment of human behavior for the purpose of  detecting suspicious behavior of persons in public or while personnel interactions such as surveys. This process is supported by automated processes. The aim of the automated behavior analysis is the detection of individuals with bad intentions (e.g. terrorists) and the prevention of their actions in advance or uncovering already committed deeds.     

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