Knowledgebase

Number of results: 13

The European Entry Exit System (EES)

Document type: 
Legal Trend card
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
CEPS for the SOURCE project
Abstract: 

The idea of developing a European Entry and Exit System dates back to February 2013 with a first proposal published by the European Commission on a “Smart Borders Package” to better manage increase

d traveller flows and efficiently respond to security concerns. It was composed of 1) an Entry-Exit System (EES) to replace the passport stamping and have a record of overstays, 2) a Registered Traveller Programme (RTP) for frequent travellers to benefit from a pre-screening procedure and be able to use Automated Border Control (ABC) gates like EU citizens and 3) amendments to the Schengen Borders Code to integrate the above-mentioned changes

All 25 technology trend cards

Document type: 
SOURCE publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Fraunhofer for the SOURCE project
Abstract: 

An overview of twenty five technoclogies and their trends as relevant to societal security

5G - Next Generation Mobile Network, Agent-based Modelling, Augmented Reality Systems, Automated human behavior analysis, Biometric Recognition Technologies, Bioremediation, Blockchain, CRISPR/Cas, Earthquake Prediction, Emergency Management Information Systems, European Maritime Surveillance Systems, Homomorphic Encryption, Indoor Navigation, Internet of Things Security, Machine Learning for Security Applications, Nano Air Vehicles, Non-lethal electromagnetic weapons for crowd control, Post-Quantum Cryptography, Predictive Policing, Quantum Cryptography, Serious Games, Smart Grid, Swarm Robotics, Through-the-Wall Sensing, Whole Body Scanner, 

 

Smartening border security in the European Union: An associational inquiry

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Dialogue, 47 (4): 292–309
Abstract: 

This contribution asks how the reliance on mass dataveillance of travellers is sustained as a central policy option in the governance of EU border security.

It examines this question by analysing a recent initiative of the European Commission proposing the establishment of EU ‘smart borders’. The analysis draws from a set of thinking tools developed by the sociology of association in the field of science and technology studies. The contribution argues that in order to grasp policy outcomes such as smart borders, security studies would benefit from adopting a compositional outlook on agency, where action is seen as the effect of associated entities. Looking at the smartening of EU borders, the article finds that this process is held together by multiple translations and enrolments through which the technical side of dataveillance – platforms, automated gates, matching systems, and so forth – has become associated with the processes of policymaking on border security and sustains the furtherance of mass dataveillance.

The US surveillance programmes and their impact on EU citizens' fundamental rights

Document type: 
Report
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
European Parliament / LIBE
Abstract: 

In light of the recent PRISM-related revelations, this briefing note analyzes the impact of US surveillance programmes on European citizens’ rights.

The note explores the scope of surveillance that can be carried out under the US FISA Amendments Act 2008, and related practices of the US authorities which have very strong implications for EU data sovereignty and the protection of European citizens’ rights. 

National Programmes for Mass Surveillance of Personal Data in EU Member States and their Compatibility wit EU Law

Document type: 
Report
Publisher / Publication: 
European Parliament / LIBE Committee
Abstract: 

In the wake of the disclosures surrounding PRISM and other US surveillance programmes, this study makes an assessment of the large-scale surveillance practices by a selection of EU member states: t

he UK, Sweden, France, Germany and the Netherlands. Given the large-scale nature of surveillance practices at stake, which represent a reconfiguration of traditional intelligence gathering, the study contends that an analysis of European surveillance programmes cannot be reduced to a question of balance between data protection versus national security, but has to be framed in terms of collective freedoms and democracy. It finds that four of the five EU member states selected for in-depth examination are engaging in some form of large-scale interception and surveillance of communication data, and identifies parallels and discrepancies between these programmes and the NSA-run operations. The study argues that these surveillance programmes do not stand outside the realm of EU intervention but can be engaged from an EU law perspective via (i) an understanding of national security in a democratic rule of law framework where fundamental human rights standards and judicial oversight constitute key standards; (ii) the risks presented to the internal security of the Union as a whole as well as the privacy of EU citizens as data owners, and (iii) the potential spillover into the activities and responsibilities of EU agencies. The study then presents a set of policy recommendations to the European Parliament. 

After Snowden: Rethinking the Impact of Surveillance

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Publisher / Publication: 
International Political Sociology, 8 (2): 121-144
Abstract: 

Current revelations about the secret US-NSA program, PRISM, have confirmed the large-scale mass surveillance of the telecommunication and electronic messages of governments, companies, and citizens

, including the United States' closest allies in Europe and Latin America. The transnational ramifications of surveillance call for a re-evaluation of contemporary world politics' practices. The debate cannot be limited to the United States versus the rest of the world or to surveillance versus privacy; much more is at stake. This collective article briefly describes the specificities of cyber mass surveillance, including its mix of the practices of intelligence services and those of private companies providing services around the world. It then investigates the impact of these practices on national security, diplomacy, human rights, democracy, subjectivity, and obedience.

NeoConOpticon: The EU Security-Industrial Complex

Document type: 
Report
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Transnational Institute / Statewatch
Abstract: 

Are we turning a blind eye to a new kind of arms race?

One in which all the weapons are pointing inwards? This report reveals the extent to which Europe’s largest defence and IT contractors are benefiting from a €1.4 billion EU “security research” programme.

The EU’s security and R&D policy is coalescing around a high-tech blueprint for a new kind of security. Eventhough it is often with a benign intent behind collaborative European ‘research’ into integrated land, air, maritime, space and cyber-surveillance systems. It envisages a future world of red zones and green zones; external borders controlled by military force and internally by a sprawling network of physical and virtual security checkpoints; public spaces, micro-states and ‘mega events’ policed by high-tech surveillance systems and rapid reaction forces; ‘peacekeeping’ and ‘crisis management’ missions that make no operational distinction between the suburbs of Basra or the Banlieue; and the increasing integration of defence and national security functions at home and abroad.

It is not just a case of “sleepwalking into” or “waking up to” a “surveillance society”, as the Britain’s Information Commissioner famously warned, it feels more like turning a blind eye to the start of a new kind of arms race, one in which all the weapons are pointing inwards. Welcome to the Neo-ConOpticon.

 

Surveillance in Europe

Document type: 
Book
Publisher / Publication: 
Routledge
Abstract: 

Surveillance in Europe is an accessible, definitive and comprehensive overview of the rapidly growing multi-disciplinary field of surveillance studies in Europe.

Written by experts in the field, including leading scholars, the Companion’s clear and up to date style will appeal to a wide range of scholars and students in the social sciences, arts and humanities.

Big Data Surveillance

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Surveillance & Society 12(2): 185-196
Abstract: 

One of the less publicized facts about the deployment of surveillance and military drones is that in addition to weapons, cameras, and other sensors, they are equipped with a device called an “Air

Handler” that can capture all available wireless data traffic in the area. As one of the rare news accounts about this device put it, when a drone goes out on a mission, “the NSA [National Security Agency] has put a device on it that is not actually under the control of the CIA or the military; it is just sucking up data for the NSA” (Goodman 2014).

Ethical Aspects of Biometric Identification Technologies in a Multicultural Society

Document type: 
Other publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
CENTRE FOR SCIENCE, SOCIETY AND CITIZENSHIP-ROME
Abstract: 

EACME Anuual Meeting presentation

Pages

Go to top