Knowledgebase

Number of results: 64

Countering Terrorist Narratives

Document type: 
Report
Publisher / Publication: 
Directorate-General for Internal Policies - POLICY DEPARTMENT FOR CITIZENS' RIGHTS AND CONSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS
Abstract: 

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, provides an overview of current approac

hes to countering terrorist narratives. The first and second sections outline the different responses developed at the global and European Union levels. The third section presents an analysis of four different approaches to responding to terrorist narratives: disruption of propaganda distribution, redirect method, campaign and message design, and government communications and synchronisation of message and action. The final section offers a number of policy recommendations, highlighting five interrelated ‘lines of effort’ essential to maximising the efficiency and effectiveness of counterterrorism and countering violent extremism strategic communication. 

The politics of securitization and the Muhammad cartoon crisis: A post-structuralist perspective

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Dialogue, Vol. 42, No. 4-5: 357–369
Abstract: 

A broad array of authors and schools have influenced Barry Buzan and Ole Wæver’s formulation of securitization theory, including John L. Austin, Jacques Derrida and Carl Schmitt.

This article draws attention to and strengthens the post-structuralist elements in the writings of Buzan and Wæver, as this part of the theory has received less attention than those attributable to Schmitt and Austin. Starting from securitization theory as developed by Buzan and Wæver and engaging with later expansions of the theory, I suggest a post-structuralist framework built around three questions: Through which discursive structures are cases and phenomena represented and incorporated into a larger discursive field? What is the epistemic terrain through which phenomena are known? And, what are the substantial modalities that define what kind of an issue a security problem is? The last part of the article brings this framework to bear on the ‘Muhammad cartoon crisis’ that began with the publication of 12 cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten in 2005.

Politics, Security, Theory

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Dialogue, Vol. 42, No. 4-5: 465–480
Abstract: 

This article outlines three ways of analysing the ‘politics of securitization’, emphasizing an often-overlooked form of politics practised through theory design.

The structure and nature of a theory can have systematic political implications. Analysis of this ‘politics of securitization’ is distinct from both the study of political practices of securitization and explorations of competing concepts of politics among security theories. It means tracking what kinds of analysis the theory can produce and whether such analysis systematically impacts real-life political struggles. Securitization theory is found to ‘act politically’ through three structural features that systematically shape the political effects of using the theory. The article further discusses – on the basis of the preceding articles in the special issue – three emerging debates around securitization theory: ethics, transformations and post-Western analyses. The article finally suggests one possible way forward for securitization theory: a route built on first clarifying its concept of theory, then specifying more clearly the place of political theory and causal mechanisms in different parts of the analysis. The politics of securitization accordingly becomes sharpened. Instead of deducing the political quality of the theory from various empirical statements by its proponents, this approach zooms in on the very core of the theory: how does it structurally condition work done with it in systematically political ways?

Video Interviews on “Security and Societal Issues: how to strike the good balance”

Document type: 
Interview/sound/video
Video: 
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
SOURCE Network
Abstract: 

During the organization of the Roundtable on “Security and Societal Issues: how to strike the good balance” that took place in Brussels on the 8th February 2016, three video interviews with the mai

n speakers were conducted.

Predictive Policing of Cybercrime

Document type: 
Interview/sound/video
Video: 
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
SOURCE Network
Abstract: 

On the 15th of June 2015, in Brussels, experts in cyber security and predictive policing from around Europe, representing all stakeholder groups (police, industry, policy making, civil society, tec

hnology and academia), expressed their concerns about the new societal challenges brought forward by the use of modern technologies and cyber-crime. The outcome of the debate is summarised in this short video.

People, States & Fear - An Agenda for International Security Studies in the Post-Cold War Era (2nd Edition)

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
ECPR Press
Abstract: 

The second edition of this widely acclaimed book takes as its main theme the question of how states and societies pursue freedom from threat in an environment in which competitive relations are ine

scapable across the political, economic, military, societal and environmental landscapes. Throughout, attention is placed on the interplay of threats and vulnerabilities, the policy consequences of overemphasising one or the other, and the existence of contradictions within and between ideas about security. 

Barry Buzan argues that the concept of security is a versatile, penetrating and useful way to approach the study of international relations. Security provides an analytical framework which stands between the extremes of power and peace, incorporates most of their insights and adds more of its own. People, States and Fear is essential reading for all students and researchers of international politics and security studies. 

A new introduction, placing this classic text in a current context, was added to this book by the author in 2007.

Elsa Ray on Counter-Radicalization and Islamophobia

Document type: 
Interview/sound/video
Video: 
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
SOURCE Network
Abstract: 

Elsa Ray is the Project manager and spokesperson of the Le Collectif Contre l’Islamophobie en France (CCIF), a civil society organization that supports victims of islamophobia in France.

CCIF also conducts monitoring and reporting, provides legal assistance and participates in European and international projects that target countering islamophobia. This video interview is a part of a series of interviews with experts in the field of security for SOURCE Virtual centre of excellence for research support and coordination on societal security. 

Made by Ólöf Söebech and Louise Baduel

News Frames and National Security - Covering Big Brother

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Cambridge University Press
Abstract: 

Did media coverage contribute to Americans' tendency to favor national security over civil liberties following the 9/11 attacks?

How did news framing of terrorist threats support the expanding surveillance state revealed by Edward Snowden? Douglas M. McLeod and Dhavan V. Shah explore the power of news coverage to render targeted groups suspicious and to spur support for government surveillance. They argue that the tendency of journalists to frame stories around individual targets of surveillance - personifying the domestic threat - shapes citizens' judgments about tolerance and participation, leading them to limit the civil liberties of a range of groups under scrutiny and to support 'Big Brother'.
 

Hacking the Human - Social Engineering Techniques and Security Countermeasures

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Routledge
Abstract: 

Information security is about people, yet in most organizations protection remains focused on technical countermeasures.

The human element is crucial in the majority of successful attacks on systems and attackers are rarely required to find technical vulnerabilities, hacking the human is usually sufficient. Ian Mann turns the black art of social engineering into an information security risk that can be understood, measured and managed effectively. The text highlights the main sources of risk from social engineering and draws on psychological models to explain the basis for human vulnerabilities. Chapters on vulnerability mapping, developing a range of protection systems and awareness training provide a practical and authoritative guide to the risks and countermeasures that are available. There is a singular lack of useful information for security and IT professionals regarding the human vulnerabilities that social engineering attacks tend to exploit. Ian Mann provides a rich mix of examples, applied research and practical solutions that will enable you to assess the level of risk in your organization; measure the strength of your current security and enhance your training and systemic countermeasures accordingly. If you are responsible for physical or information security or the protection of your business and employees from significant risk, then Hacking the Human is a must-read.

Security officers’ attitudes towards training and their work environment

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Journal, 29 (3): 385–399
Abstract: 

A body of research has examined the nature of security work, legislative efforts and training requirements.

Fewer studies, however, have explored security officers’ perceptions of the training they received to perform their duties effectively. Although effort has been made to explore how useful the extant of training regime is for security officers in Canada (Manzo, 2009), it is unclear whether such views would hold among security officers in the United States, as both countries have minimal standard requirements regarding training. Building from Manzo’s (2009) research, we use in-depth interviews with 19 US security officers to explore security officers’ perceptions of training and what, if any, additional training security officers perceive that they need to perform their job effectively. Similar to Manzo’s work, we found that some of the officers improvise the needs and demands of their jobs with experiences drawn from prior employment; however, unlike Manzo’s study, security officers perceived a lack of adequate training to perform their tasks effectively and strongly endorsed the importance of and need for systematic and standardized training.

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