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Number of results: 23

Critical infrastructure protection: Requirements and challenges for the 21st century

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
International Journal of Critical Infrastructure Protection, Vol. 8: 53-66
Abstract: 

Critical infrastructures play a vital role in supporting modern society.

The reliability, performance, continuous operation, safety, maintenance and protection of critical infrastructures are national priorities for countries around the world. This paper explores the vulnerabilities and threats facing modern critical infrastructures with special emphasis on industrial control systems, and describes a number of protection measures. The paper also discusses some of the challenging areas related to critical infrastructure protection such as governance and security management, secure network architectures, self-healing, modeling and simulation, wide-area situational awareness, forensics and learning, and trust management and privacy.

Tets document

Document type: 
Other publication
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Publisher / Publication: 
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Abstract: 

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Securing through the failure to secure? The ambiguity of resilience at the bombsite

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Dialogue, 46 (1): 69-85
Abstract: 

Resilience discourses resignify uncertainty and insecurity as the means to attain security.

Security failure is resignified as productive and becomes part of the story about security learning and improvements in anticipatory capability. In this article, I explore questions of failure mediation and ‘securing through insecurity’. If resilience policies suggest that failure and insecurity can be mediated and redeployed in the cause of success, what becomes of visceral sites of security failure such as the terrorist bombsite? This article focuses on a site where security agencies failed to prevent the bombing of a packed nightclub in Bali, in order to explore ambiguity of failure in the resilience era. It considers the efforts of politicians and activists to perform the site as resilient, and the spatial and temporal excess which eludes this performance. The article contributes to critical literatures on resilience by showing, through the ambiguities of resilience at the bombsite, that resilience is a chimera with regards to its supposed incorporation of insecurity.

Security and the performative politics of resilience: Critical infrastructure protection and humanitarian emergency preparedness

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Dialogue, 46 (1): 32-50
Abstract: 

This article critically examines the performative politics of resilience in the context of the current UK Civil Contingencies (UKCC) agenda.

It places resilience within a wider politics of (in)security that seeks to govern risk by folding uncertainty into everyday practices that plan for, pre-empt, and imagine extreme events. Moving beyond existing diagnoses of resilience based either on ecological adaptation or neoliberal governmentality, we develop a performative approach that highlights the instability, contingency, and ambiguity within attempts to govern uncertainties. This performative politics of resilience is investigated via two case studies that explore 1) critical national infrastructure protection and 2) humanitarian emergency preparedness. By drawing attention to the particularities of how resilient knowledge is performed and what it does in diverse contexts, we repoliticize resilience as an ongoing, incomplete, and potentially self-undermining discourse.

Joint Framework on countering hybrid threats - a European Union response - JOIN (2016) 18

Document type: 
Policy document
Publisher / Publication: 
European Commission / European External Action Service (EEAS)
Abstract: 

This Joint Communication aims to facilitate a holistic approach that will enable the EU, in coordination with Member States, to specifically counter threats of a hybrid nature by creating synergies

between all relevant instruments and fostering close cooperation between all relevant actors. The actions build on existing strategies and sectoral policies that contribute to achieving greater security. In particular, the European Agenda on Security, the European Union Global Strategy for foreign and security policy and European Defence Action Plan, the EU Cybersecurity Strategy, the Energy Security Strategy, the European Union Maritime Security Strategy are tools that may also contribute to countering hybrid threats. 

A Strategic Approach to Resilience in the EU's external action - JOIN (2017) 21

Document type: 
Policy document
Publisher / Publication: 
European Commission / European External Action Service (EEAS)
Abstract: 

The European Commission and the High Representative/Vice President Federica Mogherini present how the European Union aims to support states, societies, communities and individuals in adapting to gr

owing and increasingly long-term pressures. This is one the priorities guiding the EU's external action as presented by the EU Global Strategy. It puts a particular emphasis on anticipation, prevention and preparedness, aiming to move from crisis containment to a more structural and long-term approach to global challenges.

Intelligence tradecraft and the pre-crime approach to EU internal security governance

Document type: 
Scientific publication
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Publisher / Publication: 
Paper to the UACES 43rd Annual Conference, Leeds, 2-4 September 2013
Abstract: 

EU internal security policy has been in recent years progressively focused on prevention of threats and risks.

The 2010 Internal Security Strategy for the EU highlighted the need for ‘prevention and anticipation’ conceived as a proactive intelligence-led approach to EU internal security. A pre-crime framework has been widely applied in fields like security studies, police science, criminology, ethics, political sociology and political geography, owing to its inherent explanatory power. The core element of pre-crime approach is the selection and identification of the most probable among abstract risks and dispersed threats, and the profiling, or sorting out, of particular social groups or individuals posing presumably imminent threats. This paper aims at inserting the concept of intelligence tradecraft into the pre-crime analytical framework and verify the usefulness of such an approach to the study of EU internal security governance. The paper will focus on ‘intelligence process’ and ‘intelligence product’, i.e. how the stakeholders of EU internal security policy construct, modify and develop ‘products’ allowing for a better risk management and threat assessment in the context of precautionary and anticipatory attitudes towards EU security governance. 

Anticipating uncertainty, reviving risk? On the stress testing of finance in crisis

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Economy and Society, 42 (1): 51-73
Abstract: 

Widely regarded as a watershed moment in the governance of the present global financial crisis, the US Treasury's Supervisory Capital Assessment Program (SCAP) of spring 2009 undertook to ‘stress t

est’ the solvency of the largest American banks by projecting their capital adequacy going forward. The SCAP is shown to have been an important intervention that restored market confidence in US banks because it rigorously embraced and acted through a subtle but significant change in the repertoires of risk management, a very public turn to anticipatory techniques designed to ensure preparedness for low-probability, high-impact events. And, as the subsequent failures of stress-testing exercises to inspire confidence in European banking are also shown to demonstrate, the performative power of these anticipatory techniques itself turns on their seemingly precise methodological application and animation by a positive affective charge.

Low-tech Security: Files, Notes and Memos as Technologies of Anticipation

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Dialogue, 45 (5): 476-493
Abstract: 

When it comes to anticipating terrorism, do recent technological advancements fundamentally change the modus operandi of intelligence services?

Recent scholarship has focused on the new modes of reasoning brought about by ‘hi-tech’ forms analysis such as data mining, graph visualization and the algorithmic treatment of big data. While this article recognizes the increasing influence of these techniques, it argues they should not overshadow much more low-tech modalities through which a large part of counterterrorism work takes place. Low-tech counter-terrorism, based on qualitative methods and conjectural reasoning, still matters. Drawing on the case of French domestic intelligence services and based on qualitative interviews, observations and declassified documents, this article shows that the practices of security professionals, rooted in traditional institutional habituses developed over time, are largely in continuity with previous ‘low-tech’ forms of police work. In a context in which the uses of digital security technologies have generated discussions about politics and ethics, this article suggests that traditional techniques of intelligence gathering and processing therefore still merit a great amount of attention.

The promise of security: resilience, surprise and epistemic politics

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses, 2 (2): 73-87
Abstract: 

Over the past decade, resilience has become a quasi-universal answer to problems of security and governance, from climate change to children's education, from indigenous history to disaster respons

e, and from development to terrorism. This article places the proliferation of resilience in relation to the earlier proliferation of security discourse and practice. Why resilience today? It answers this question by unpacking the epistemic regimes that underpin the move to resilience. Rather than tracing the differences between protection, prevention, pre-emption and resilience, the article argues that the political transformation that resilience entails becomes explicit in relation to the promise of security. Although the language of ‘promise’ and ‘promising’ has been widely used in relation to security, its political implications have remained unexplored. Underpinned by an epistemology of surprising events, resilience discourses reconfigure the promise of security. Through an empirical engagement with the turn to resilience in DFID's humanitarian policy in the UK and a theoretical reconsideration of Hannah Arendt's conceptualisation of the promise, I offer a critical vantage point on the transformation that resilience portends for our contemporary condition.

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