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Number of results: 54

The European Union’s Policies on Counter-Terrorism Relevance: Coherence and Effectiveness

Document type: 
Report
Publisher / Publication: 
Directorate-General for Internal Policies - POLICY DEPARTMENT C: CITIZENS' RIGHTS AND CONSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS
Abstract: 

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, identifies (counter-) terrorism trends,

threats and policies in the EU, focussing particularly on seven themes, including database access and interoperability, measures on border security, criminal justice and prevention of radicalisation. It also analyses the coherence and effectiveness of the counter-terrorism policy (architecture), and issues of cooperation, oversight and implementation, in particular of seven focus Member States: Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Slovakia and Spain. Moreover, this study addresses future scenarios and formulates concrete policy options and recommendations.

Advanced social engineering attacks

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Publisher / Publication: 
Journal of Information Security and Applications, Vol. 22: 113-122
Abstract: 

Social engineering has emerged as a serious threat in virtual communities and is an effective means to attack information systems.

The services used by today's knowledge workers prepare the ground for sophisticated social engineering attacks. The growing trend towards BYOD (bring your own device) policies and the use of online communication and collaboration tools in private and business environments aggravate the problem. In globally acting companies, teams are no longer geographically co-located, but staffed just-in-time. The decrease in personal interaction combined with a plethora of tools used for communication (e-mail, IM, Skype, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Lync, etc.) create new attack vectors for social engineering attacks. Recent attacks on companies such as the New York Times and RSA have shown that targeted spear-phishing attacks are an effective, evolutionary step of social engineering attacks. Combined with zero-day-exploits, they become a dangerous weapon that is often used by advanced persistent threats. This paper provides a taxonomy of well-known social engineering attacks as well as a comprehensive overview of advanced social engineering attacks on the knowledge worker.

 

Yvan de Mesmaeker on the changes in our threat environment

Document type: 
Interview/sound/video
Video: 
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
SOURCE Network
Abstract: 

Yvan de Mesmaeker is the Secretary General of the European Corporate Security Association (ECSA) and Professor at the Belgian National College for Senior Police Officers.

ECSA is an association representing over 300 security corporations that provides a trusted forum for discussions of mutual interest and to stimulate public private cooperation. This video interview is a part of a series of interviews with experts in the field of security for SOURCE Virtual centre of excellence for research support and coordination on societal security.

Made by Ólöf Söebech and Louise Baduel

How to address security threats - Ida Haisman The Hague Security Delta

Document type: 
Interview/sound/video
Video: 
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Video interview made for SOURCE
Abstract: 

Ida Haisma is the director of The Hague Security Delta (HSD), the largest security cluster in Europe, where businesses, governments and knowledge institutions work together on innovation and knowle

dge in the field of safety and security. This video interview is a part of a series of interviews with experts in the field of security for SOURCE Virtual centre of excellence for research support and coordination on societal security http://www.societalsecurity.net/ Made by Ólöf Söebech and Louise Baduel

News Frames and National Security - Covering Big Brother

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Cambridge University Press
Abstract: 

Did media coverage contribute to Americans' tendency to favor national security over civil liberties following the 9/11 attacks?

How did news framing of terrorist threats support the expanding surveillance state revealed by Edward Snowden? Douglas M. McLeod and Dhavan V. Shah explore the power of news coverage to render targeted groups suspicious and to spur support for government surveillance. They argue that the tendency of journalists to frame stories around individual targets of surveillance - personifying the domestic threat - shapes citizens' judgments about tolerance and participation, leading them to limit the civil liberties of a range of groups under scrutiny and to support 'Big Brother'.
 

Threat Politics: New Perspectives on Security, Risk and Crisis Management

Document type: 
Book
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Routledge
Abstract: 

Aiming to open up a new perspective on the study of threats and risks, this text combines insights from the thematically linked but academically disassociated fields of security studies, risk studi

es and crisis management studies. It provides case studies of key agents, arenas and issues involved in the politics of threats. In addition to the traditional unit of analysis - national governments - this book takes into account non-governmental agents, including public opinion, the media and business.

European Union Internet Organised Crime Threat Assessment (IOCTA) 2017

Document type: 
Report
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
EUROPOL
Abstract: 

Each year, Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) publishes the Internet Organised Crime Threat Assessment (IOCTA), its flagship strategic report on key findings and emerging threats

and developments in cybercrime — threats that impact governments, businesses and citizens in the EU. The IOCTA provides key recommendations to law enforcement, policy makers and regulators to allow them to respond to cybercrime in an effective and concerted manner. The report focuses on the crime areas that fall under EC3’s mandate. These cybercrime priorities, which are determined by the EU Policy Cycle, are currently: Cyber-dependent crime, Online child sexual exploitation and Payment fraud. The most recent IOCTA also looks at an additional crime area, online criminal markets, both on the surface web and Darknet. It also addresses the convergence of cyber and terrorism. Another typical focus of the IOCTA are cross-cutting crime enablers, factors that straddle more than one crime area but are not necessarily inherently criminal themselves. These enablers include phishing/smishing/vishing, business email compromise, bulletproof hosting, anonymisation tools, criminal abuse of cryptocurrencies and money muling.

European Union Serious and Organised Crime Threat Assessment (SOCTA) 2017

Document type: 
Report
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
EUROPOL
Abstract: 

The European Union (EU) Serious and Organised Crime Threat Assessment (SOCTA) 2017 is a detailed analysis of the threat of serious and organised crime facing the EU providing information for practi

tioners, decision-makers and the wider public. Europol is the EU’s law enforcement agency and assists the 28 EU Member States in their fight against serious international crime and terrorism. For the SOCTA 2017, Europol has undertaken the largest-ever data collection on serious and organised crime in the EU. Europol relied on thousands of contributions by Member States, Europol’s operational and strategic partners outside the EU and our institutional partners as well as operational intelligence held in Europol’s databases to produce the most detailed assessment of the nature and scale of criminal threats facing the EU and its Member States.

European Union Terrorism Situation and Trend Report (Te-Sat) 2017

Document type: 
Report
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
EUROPOL
Abstract: 

Europol’s annual EU Terrorism Situation and Trend Report (TE-SAT) provides an overview of the terrorism phenomenon in the EU in a given year. The fight against terrorism is a top pri

ority for the EU and for Europol, and that means that TE-SAT is one of Europol’s most significant pieces of strategic analysis. It offers law enforcement officials, policymakers and the general public facts and figures on terrorism in the EU, while also identifying developing trends in this crime area, based on information that Member States make available to Europol. The report, which Europol has produced each year since 2007, charts the established and evolving drivers of terrorism. These drivers can change or vanish over time in response to political or socio-economic developments, merge with other ideologies or convictions and be the building blocks of new and sometimes very specific and highly individual motivations. The TE-SAT is prepared by experts at Europol and is based on information provided and verified by EU Member States and by Europol’s partners. It also relies on quantitative and qualitative data that Eurojust and the Member States provide.

The economics of private security expenditure: The influence of perceptions of crime

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Security Journal, 30 (2): 401-416
Abstract: 

Given that crime is a complex societal problem, the argument to embrace interdisciplinary scholarship seems an obvious one.

The study of crime and its control, however, has largely remained multidisciplinary in nature. In this article, we provide an interdisciplinary, accessible economic model for understanding choices by individuals, as well as demonstrate the application of self-reported life satisfaction data to the issue of property crime. We find that: individuals’ perceptions of crime in their local area are far greater than actual levels of crime; the gap between perceived and real crime is widening; and real crime rates detract more from an individual’s self-reported life satisfaction than perceived rates of crime. However, perceived rates of crime have an adverse impact on life satisfaction beyond those associated with real crime. Together, these results suggest that societal welfare could be significantly enhanced by reducing individual’s perceptions of crime, irrespective of any changes in the real crime rate.

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