Knowledgebase

Number of results: 12

E-Handbook on Societal Security Crises and Emergency Response in Europe

Document type: 
SOURCE publication
Publisher / Publication: 
Insitute for European Studies, Vrije Universiteit Brussel for the SOURCE project
Abstract: 

The e-handbook is an innovative educational tool for first responders managing crises in the area of societal security.

It features six multi-media case-studies coming from different parts of Europe, namely: Austria, Sweden, Belgium, and Spain. The case-studies explore and re-construct strategies and actions of first response professionals involved in management of socio-political emergencies and natural disasters. In addition to texts, the interactive content includes educational assignments and video interviews, in which professionals, who took on key roles in the crisis management and emergency response, share their experiences.

Advanced social engineering attacks

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Publisher / Publication: 
Journal of Information Security and Applications, Vol. 22: 113-122
Abstract: 

Social engineering has emerged as a serious threat in virtual communities and is an effective means to attack information systems.

The services used by today's knowledge workers prepare the ground for sophisticated social engineering attacks. The growing trend towards BYOD (bring your own device) policies and the use of online communication and collaboration tools in private and business environments aggravate the problem. In globally acting companies, teams are no longer geographically co-located, but staffed just-in-time. The decrease in personal interaction combined with a plethora of tools used for communication (e-mail, IM, Skype, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Lync, etc.) create new attack vectors for social engineering attacks. Recent attacks on companies such as the New York Times and RSA have shown that targeted spear-phishing attacks are an effective, evolutionary step of social engineering attacks. Combined with zero-day-exploits, they become a dangerous weapon that is often used by advanced persistent threats. This paper provides a taxonomy of well-known social engineering attacks as well as a comprehensive overview of advanced social engineering attacks on the knowledge worker.

 

Investing in disaster management capabilities versus pre-positioning inventory: A new approach to disaster preparedness

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
International Journal of Production Economics, 157: 261-272
Abstract: 

Disaster preparedness has been recognized as a central element in reducing the impact of disasters worldwide.

The usual methods of preparedness, such as pre-positioning relief inventory in countries prone to disasters, are problematic because they require high investment in various locations, due to the uncertainty about the timing and location of the next disaster. Investing in disaster management capabilities, such as training staff, pre-negotiating customs agreements with countries prone to disasters, or harmonizing import procedures with local customs clearance procedures, has been recognized as a way to overcome this constraint. By means of system dynamics modeling, we model the delivery process of ready-to-use therapeutic food items during the immediate response phase of a disaster, and we analyze the performance of different preparedness scenarios. We find that pre-positioning inventory produces positive results for the beneficiaries, but at extremely high costs. Investing in disaster management capabilities is an interesting alternative, as it allows lead time reductions of up to 67% (18 days) compared to a scenario without preparedness, at significantly lower costs than pre-positioning inventory. We find that the best performance can be achieved when combining both preparedness strategies, allocating part of the available funding to disaster management capabilities and part to pre-positioning inventory. We analyze 2828 such combined scenarios to identify the best mix of preparedness strategies for different levels of available funding. On the basis of our findings, we provide recommendations for relief organizations on how to allocate their preparedness budget.

Action Plan to enhance preparedness against chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear security risks - COM (2017) 610

Document type: 
Policy document
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
European Commission
Abstract: 

This Action Plan aims to increase the European cooperation to strengthen CBRN security with a focus on preventing, preparing for, and responding to CBRN threat and terrorism attacks.

Actions set out in this Communication will support Member States to protect citizens and infrastructures. Many of the proposed actions pursue an all-hazards approach and will also contribute to improving preparedness for any large scale CBRN incidents unconnected to terrorism. 

A Strategic Approach to Resilience in the EU's external action - JOIN (2017) 21

Document type: 
Policy document
Publisher / Publication: 
European Commission / European External Action Service (EEAS)
Abstract: 

The European Commission and the High Representative/Vice President Federica Mogherini present how the European Union aims to support states, societies, communities and individuals in adapting to gr

owing and increasingly long-term pressures. This is one the priorities guiding the EU's external action as presented by the EU Global Strategy. It puts a particular emphasis on anticipation, prevention and preparedness, aiming to move from crisis containment to a more structural and long-term approach to global challenges.

Eurobarometer - Civil Protection

Document type: 
Report
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Special Eurobarometer 454
Abstract: 

The aim of this survey is to explore EU citizen awareness, support, perceptions and attitudes towards the European Union’s activities in the area of civil protection.

It will examine opinions regarding the need for providing assistance in a coordinated manner as well as whether they consider the EU is doing enough to prevent or prepare for disasters. Finally, the survey will determine the preferred medium for further information about civil protection policy. 

A summary of risk areas and scenario analyses 2012–2015

Document type: 
Report
Publisher / Publication: 
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB)
Abstract: 

The report presents a comprehensive overview of the different risks Sweden faces, risks which could have a serious impact on key Swedish national values of protection: human life and health, societ

y’s functionality, economy and the environment, democracy, rule of law, and human rights and freedoms, and national sovereignty. For the purpose of clarity, MSB has categorised the risks into four main categories. The four main categories are: natural hazards, major accidents, disruption to technical infrastructure and supply systems, and antagonistic hazards. The types of risk that could arise, their impact, examples of past incidents, and the responsibility in relation to these risks are discussed for each category. Where MSB has conducted a scenario analysis in relation to the risk area, the results of this are presented after the initial risk description. Each scenario has been analysed based on the capability of society to prevent and respond to the scenario in respect of its potential impact on Sweden’s national values of protection. Each analysis also includes a discussion related to the likelihood, sensitivity, and uncertainties pertaining to the scenario.

Potential Politics and the Primacy of Preemption

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Theory and Event 10 (2).
Abstract: 

The doctrine of preemption would lead the United States from the invasion of Afghanistan to the War in Iraq, and carry Bush himself to reelection in 2004.

It would also lead, after another two short but eventful years, to the dramatic defeat of the President’s party in the 2006 mid-term elections. The most immediate casualty of that defeat would be Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, the individual most identified in the public’s mind with the doctrine of preemption and its translation into action in Iraq. 

The reaction to the North Korean government’s October 2006 announcement that it had tested a nuclear weapon, seemed to be another sign that the Bush administration’s defining doctrine of preemption was fast becoming history. For here was a “fully materialized” threat, and the Bush administration was not rushing to take a unilateral “path to action.” Instead, it was emphasizing just the kind of multilateral, non-military response it had brushed aside in its rush to invade Iraq. At the same time, Bush also changed his tune on Iraq and reinterpreted the mantra he had intoned for months. “Stay the course,” he said, really meant “don’t leave before the job is done,” and getting the job done, he continued, sometimes means “change tactics.”

The President’s own admission of the need for a change and the Democrats’ subsequent regaining of control of both houses of Congress led many to the conclusion that the direction of the country was about to take a major turn.

Preemption, Precaution, Preparedness: Anticipatory Action and Future Geographies

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
Progress in Human Geography, 34(6): 777-798
Abstract: 

The paper focuses on how futures are anticipated and acted on in relation to a set of events that are taken to threaten liberal democracies.

Across different domains of life the future is now problematized as a disruption, a surprise. This problematization of the future as indeterminate or uncertain has been met with an extraordinary proliferation of anticipatory action. The paper argues that anticipatory action works through the assembling of: styles through which the form of the future is disclosed and related to; practices that render specific futures present; and logics through which anticipatory action is legitimized, guided and enacted.

Governing Terrorism Through Risk: Taking Precautions, (un)Knowing the Future

Document type: 
Scientific publication
Authors / Institution: 
Publisher / Publication: 
European Journal of International Relations March 2007 vol. 13 no. 1 89-115
Abstract: 

The events of 9/11 appeared to make good on Ulrich Beck's claim that we are now living in a (global) risk society.

Examining what it means to ‘govern through risk’, this article departs from Beck's thesis of risk society and its appropriation in security studies. Arguing that the risk society thesis problematically views risk within a macro-sociological narrative of modernity, this article shows, based on a Foucauldian account of governmentality, that governing terrorism through risk involves a permanent adjustment of traditional forms of risk management in light of the double infinity of catastrophic consequences and the incalculability of the risk of terrorism. Deploying the Foucauldian notion of ‘dispositif’, this article explores precautionary risk and risk analysis as conceptual tools that can shed light on the heterogeneous practices that are defined as the ‘war on terror’.

Pages

Go to top